Three Easy Spring Snare Traps

Trapping animals can be a great way of getting your necessary protein if you’re not near a supermarket. Watch as YouTuber Clan Gunn Bushcraft demonstrates some useful snare traps for you to use.

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How to use an umbrella as a weapon

*Note* – I write this as an Australian, meaning I need to consider an umbrella as a weapon. We are legally denied any right to bear arms and are barely allowed to defend ourselves against an attack. If you’re an American, wave your guns and laugh at us. You’re lucky to have the right to bear arms and defend yourselves. Here in Australia anything that would give us a chance of winning a fight is illegal. That said, the best self defenses are keeping a sharp look-out for trouble and knowing when to run. In any violent confrontation, you risk being killed or accidentally killing.

In some ways, the umbrella is the ultimate everyday weapon. It has all the key parts of an everyday weapon in abundance – deniability, alternative utility, and of course defensive capability. An umbrella is useful no matter the weather. On hot sunny days, I don’t care who sneers at me – my umbrella keeps me out of direct sunlight and cool. In the rain, now stick with me here cause this is gonna blow your mind, my umbrella stops me from catching a soaking. Umbrellas have all-weather utility, which means you can explain carrying one no matter what the forecast is.

Umbrella as a weapon

Unlike chopsticks, a pen, or a your car keys, an umbrella increases your range. You won’t have to come within kissing distance with some crook to deliver your message. You can hold your attacker out of range, keeping yourself clear of the danger of any weapons he may have. You can parry, stab, or just take a big baseball swing, because an umbrella gives about an extra meter of reach. That’s roughly a “yard” for our Yankee comrades. The other amazing defensive capability of an umbrella was demonstrated in Hong Kong’s ‘Umbrella Revolution’ in 2014. People were using these $2 umbrellas from 7-11 to stop police pepper spray, and it worked.

umbrella as a weapon

Note though, that using an normal umbrella as a weapon will be the end of that umbrella. There are a lot of fine moving parts in an umbrella, all of which would be damaged beyond use if you delivered even one meaningful blow with it. That’s why I have my eye on a product called the ‘Unbreakable Umbrella‘. Don’t get me wrong – I’m not shilling this one. Not yet anyway. I want to get one to review to see if it really can stand up to real world abuse. There’s a video on the manufacturer’s webpage of a guy standing on the umbrella horizontally, suspended between two chairs. Then he takes the umbrella and cleaves a watermelon in twain with it. In twain!! So yeah, I’m interested in seeing it for myself.

Check out the rest of the Everyday Weapons Series

How to use chopsticks as weapons

How to use drumsticks as weapons

How to use keys as weapons

How to use a pen as a weapon

How to use an umbrella as a weapon

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Light a fire with water!

Check out this neat video in which YouTuber Grant Thompson shows us how to light a fire using water. Now yes, I agree this is a click-bait title that tells the facts but obscures the truth. He’s using water to light a fire, but obviously not by pouring water all over the materials he wants to burn. Cause, cause, that’d just be like, silly or whatever lol!

A sandwich bag filled with water, twisted to raise the pressure and stretch the plastic film tight, can become an effective lens for focusing sunlight. When you’ve taken some bark and ground it into powder, focus the sun’s light onto it and get it smoldering. As your bark powder smokes and smolders, transfer it across to your starter materials such as dry grass or leaves. Blow into the smoking grass to get the flames roaring. Naturally, this technique will only be helpful on a bright, sunny day. I think it’s better to know too many ways of making fire than too few though.

 

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How long will food keep?

The invention of refrigeration is, in my opinion, as revolutionary as the development of agriculture. Its impact was similar, allowing people to spend less time in the day working on basic survival and more time for other things. Things like whether monkeys are actually talking to each other, what the other side of the moon looks like, and why, why is there always one bolt left over when you built the table just like the Swedish instructions told you to. But I digress. This handy chart I’ve included below will give you an idea of how long your food will last unaided, refrigerated, and frozen. These things are good to know, especially if you want to keep at least some fresh foods in a prepping stockpile (hint – potatoes).

For example, did you know you only have a couple of hours in which to use your unrefrigerated meats? That means while you’re hopping from foot to foot, painfully aware of the ticking of the clock, you have to make a fast decision on what to do with that while chicken. Cook it and you’ll probably have another 6-8 hours before it’s back to turning poisonous. Freeze it and it’ll last the rest of the year and double as an everyday weapon.

Pumpkins and potatoes are great keepers if the shelf is your only option. Although it’s not listed, pumpkin will happily sit waiting for you for a few months. Cut it, and its exposed flesh will dry out to form a protective layer. Even cut pumpkin can keep for about a week on the shelf. It goes without saying though, that pumpkins and potatoes will keep better in cooler storage areas that aren’t in direct sunlight.

It’s good to know that canned food isn’t your only option when it comes to preparing a survival stockpile. Rotating your stockpile, oldest to the front, ensures that you’re using what needs to be used first and keeping what will last for longer “just in case”.

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How can you use keys as weapons?

*Note* – I write this as an Australian, meaning I need to consider keys as weapons. We are legally denied any right to bear arms and are barely allowed to defend ourselves against an attack. If you’re an American, wave your guns and laugh at us. You’re lucky to have the right to bear arms and defend yourselves. Here in Australia anything that would give us a chance of winning a fight is illegal. That said, the best self defenses are keeping a sharp look-out for trouble and knowing when to run. In any violent confrontation, you risk being killed or accidentally killing.

Keys as weapons

Nearly everyone carries a set of keys with them. We have things we need to access and lock up, things we need to drive, things we need to pick out of our teeth when there’s nothing else to pick with. Keys are ubiquitous (except with homeless people), so there’s no real need for anyone to hassle us if we’re carrying them. This makes them a good example of an everyday weapon. Something you carry, that everyone else is probably carrying too, that in a crisis can become a leverage point to secure your survival.

keys weapons

 

Now I can see the raised eyebrows and frowns. How can keys be a good weapon, you whine. I don’t make the rules. All I know is that if you’ve got something useful, your day in court isn’t going to go your way. So what we’re going to do is to look at some different ways that you could use a set of keys as an everyday weapon in a self-defensive situation.  It’s not ideal or fair, but who ever said it was going to be?

Keys are usually only about 5cm long. You’re unlikely to carry a key that is even 10cm long unless you’re a jailer from the middle ages. Those good old keys that could be something substantial to thrust into an aggressor’s ribs are sadly a thing of the past. So take a look at your keys and think about how you’re going to turn a uselessly small metal shape into an advantage in a violent confrontation. Are they going to go between your fingers like this?

keys weapons

I hope you’ll say no. You’re not Wolverine, and your keys aren’t your claws. In this position, your keys will turn back onto the soft flesh between your knuckles and maybe even do you irreparable harm. If you want a demo of how much this is going to hurt you, make a Wolverine key fist and tap your punching bag lightly. Feel the keys shift into your soft flesh? They’ll chew you up, and in a violent confrontation, leave you worse off than if you’d simply been robbed.

keys weapons

Keys are really a dead last resort as an everyday weapon. If you practice using them, finding out how to deliver concentrated force right through the tip of the key, then you will have some extra confidence in your abilities if it comes to it. You can train your grip by holding your keys in the grip I demonstrate above, basically pinching hard between thumb and index finger. Train in thrusting your key in this grip into a stack of cardboard or a punching bag (if you don’t mind getting holes in it). You will get a feel for how the key behaves under impact. Then, if you feel unsafe in the street, you can automatically get your key ready in your pocket as you look for a way out of trouble.

But using keys, you’re extending your range all of 2cm. With this, your risk of injury from being within range of your attacker is still very high. Keys are not much help in a fight. You can’t break a bone with a key or knock someone down with the extra kinetic energy they add to your attacks. You can really only aim for weak points (eyes, throat, groin, ears) and hang on to the inconveniently tiny metal tab at the end of the key for dear life. Strike hard and repeatedly, aiming to surprise your attacker without giving them a chance to regain their balance. If your attacker isn’t too jacked up on drugs or adrenaline you may be able to hurt them enough to take the fight out of them. One should never hope to have to use keys in defense of one’s life though.

Check out the rest of the Everyday Weapons Series

How to use chopsticks as weapons

How to use drumsticks as weapons

How to use keys as weapons

How to use a pen as a weapon

How to use an umbrella as a weapon

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Poisonous household plants that can kill you

Gardening is as old as mankind; as the bible says, the first man was created in a garden by the Lord God. It’s no surprise then, that even today people continue the tradition of subjugating nature to create controlled microcosms in their own backyards. Personally I have a limited tolerance for gardening. Except for its food production value, I can’t see the point. Roses can’t feed me and they have thorns, which makes them twice as useless as most other plants. Even worse than roses though, are the poisonous household plants that English gardening traditions made common in Western gardens. Growing dangerous poisons in your own yard. Why would you even do that? Except if you hate your kids and your pets…cause that’d make it a good idea to grow your own poisons…I guess? ANYWAY. Let’s look at a few common but poisonous household plants.

Oleander 

Oleander is so widely cultivated that its origins are no longer well known. The whole plant is toxic, and its flowers are only average looking so there aren’t so many reasonable explanations as to the oleander’s popularity.

oleander

Stirring hot water with an oleander branch can make poison soup. Burning any part of the oleander creates a cloud of poison smoke. The effects of oleander poisoning are seen in the gastrointestinal system, the heart, and the central nervous system. The gastrointestinal effects can include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea containing blood, and abdominal pain.  When poisoning occurs, the heart will first speed up and then slow to below normal pace, depriving extremities of proper circulation. Oleander can also cause seizures, collapse, and even coma. Thankfully, cases of oleander poisoning are rare due to its foul taste.

Castor Oil Plant 

The stuff of every nineteenth century English child’s nightmares. The castor oil plant is in the record books as the most poisonous household plant on Earth, due to its seeds high ricin content. Ricin, if you refer back to your Breaking Bad Season 1 dvd box set, is the chemical that Walter and Jesse poison Tuco’s meth with, hoping to bump him off easily. Tuco is one crazy cat though, and refuses to smoke the ricin meth. You should also refuse to smoke ricin infused meth! Good on you reader. Just say no.

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A fatal dose of caster oil plant seeds is a low, low four to eight units. That’s right, between four and eights seeds of this poisonous plant can kill. The symptoms of caster oil plant poisoning are abdominal pain, bloody diarrhea, and severe dehydration that leads to death. Yikes. The wikipedia article for this one also calmly states that ducks can take up to eighty poisonous caster oil plant seeds before succumbing to their ultimate reality. But who in their right mind is out there testing the fatal poison tolerance of a cute little duck? Sick people, that’s who.

Deadly Nightshade

Native to Central Europe, but having since colonised many other parts of the world as a weed, is deadly nightshade. This plant has a long history of being used as a murder tool, medicine, and women’s eye drops (of all things). Apparently to achieve the doe-eyed look in Ancient Rome, the lady in-the-know could just mix up some deadly nightshade eye drops and – boom! – instant moonpools. And all she had to do was drop deadly, deadly poison into her own eyeballs. So easy!

deadly nightshade

Ingestion of the leaf, root, or berries of the deadly nightshade can be fatal. In fact, as few as two berries or one leaf are enough to cause death. What’s even more upsetting about this plant is that the berries are attractive, glossy mini-cherry looking things that allegedly even taste faintly sweet. I can only recommend that you stop at the first one.

Rhododendron

The rhododendron grows all over the world, which is troublesome cause it’s a pain in the butt to spell. Rhododendron. Only some species of rhododendron are fatally toxic, but it pays to know which ones. Rhododendron toxins are credited with causing large numbers of casualties in a couple of historical wars that I can’t be bothered googling at the moment. These toxins were ingested by soldiers through honey that bees had made from rhododendron flowers, which just goes to show you can’t trust no one and you never could neither.

rhododendron

The leaves and flower nectar are the parts poisonous to humans, but it is difficult to accidentally get a fatal dose from a this poisonous household plant. According to google, 100 – 200 grams of the leaves are required for a dose large enough to poison a child. Again, I have to ask how this was tested…

Bushman’s Poison (Wintersweet)

Contradictory and potentially dangerous websites state that while Wintersweet sap is poisonous enough to be used by South African bushmen to make their poisoned arrows, the plum-like berries are safe for consumption. Others say the plums will severe gastrointestinal irritation including abdominal pain, excessive salivation, and vomiting. I’d err on the side of caution and avoid eating any part of the Wintersweet, romantic though its name may be.

Acokanthera-spectabilis

Wintersweet probably isn’t as popular around the world as others in this list, so maybe you won’t even see it in your travels. If you do though, you know what not to put in your mouth – any part of the plant. Right?

So there you have it, some poisonous household plants that could make your day a lot worse. Do yourself a favour and memorise them.

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Ten Great Uses For A Bandana

No, no, no. I’m not going to do 5000 ways to use a bandana just because SuperSurvivalBlog did it. Because you know what? Those guys spent 100 list items on different things you can tie with a bandana. I get it – you can use a bandana to tie things. But for me, I’m just going to give ten genuinely useful things bandana can do. Having a large cloth square in your everyday carry inventory is great because they’re so versatile and pack down so easily. You could carry two and not even notice. Anyway, let’s get started on that list shall we?

1. Headband / Hat / Neckband / Neck shade.

"Yo fuh real bro. Tellin you alls ya have to do is yell at the babes and they'll be begging to take their phone numbers yo."
“Yo fuh real bro. Tellin you alls ya have to do is yell at the babes out the window of yo’ whip and they’ll be begging to take their phone numbers yo.”

Sweat in your eyes can make anything difficult. Personally, being under full sun sets my moon-tan ablaze. A bandana can be a hat if you tie the corners, which will shield your bald head from the sun’s fury. If you soak it, a bandana can be a cooling neckband to keep the desert madness from taking you early.

2. Face mask.

harajuku
Beware though – wearing a bandana face mask *MAY* cause you to automatically become a drug dealer. Yes, even in the middle of a dust storm.

Sometimes you’re the bad guy doing something bad. Sometimes you’re the good guy doing something the cops can’t do. Sometimes you’re not the hero people want – you’re the hero they need.

In a fire or dust storm, the bandana facemask can be a lifesaver. This can be made more effective with some water. A damp cloth really helps filter air.

3. Sling or splint tie.

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A large enough bandana can be used to give comfort to someone with a broken bone. Tying a leg to a splint is very difficult without anything to tie with, but try getting an arm in a sling. A bandana is almost too versatile for its own good! Almost.

4. Extra carry pocket.

missile house

Say you find some extra gil or a potion after you beat a house that fires missiles in a sword fight. Say that happens ok? Just say it. You’re gonna need something to carry gil and potions with, aren’t you? Bundle it all up in your handy bandana and be on your way.

5. Macro filter for water.

Filter water with a bandana

It won’t make brown water clear, or get toxins / viruses / bacteria out of the water. It’ll get sand and twigs out though. Frogs too.

6. Mini-towel. 

stand-in-the-rain
Getting rained on is never this enjoyable.

Sometimes atmospheric conditions result in humidity condensing in the upper atmosphere and precipitating into increasingly large droplets of water. Forced downward by gravity, these droplets are a prime cause of wetness that, if allowed to remain on your face, will take entire minutes to dry again. Save yourself the pain and frustration of air-drying by carrying a bandana. You’ll be safe in the knowledge that you can dry yourself at any time.

7. Trail or location marker.

Bandana trail marker

If you’ve come past the bandana on a tree three times already, you need to think about how to stop going in circles. Because in all seriousness, it is easier than one thinks to lose one’s bearings in unfamiliar forests.

8. Attention-getting flag.

Hitch hiker
You got 50:50 odds she’s not a serial killer. As an aside – if hitch hiker was a single word it’d have a double ‘h’. That would make it the only word in the English language besides ‘withhold’ to do that. I know right?

If you need a distress signal or to flag down a passing motorist, a bandana can do what your socks can do AND you can keep your shoes on. As an added bonus, a bandana won’t run out of batteries. As an added negative, they’re literally useless for flagging at night time.

9. Tying things together.

http.lovedbyacollie.lifeseven.com
When this dog decided on hobo life, he also came to understand the utility of a bandana. Credit – lovedbyacollie.com

Your shoelaces need to stay where they are and you don’t have enough time this week to braid a rope from your own hair. But that bandana could hold together some sticks, or a joint in your shelter, or even the wrists of your captured foe.

10. Caveman’s Blackjack.

RockNSock
Weapons don’t come much cheaper.

You think you need to drop $200 for an effective everyday carry weapon? Heckle no, senor. Just stick a rock in that there bandana, tie all four corners, and swing it with all your might. You’ll want to practice though, because self-castration is a very real possibility with weapons of this sort.

So there you have it – ten real world uses for one cheap, simple, easy-to-carry item. The bandana is indeed as versatile as it is kinda white trash. But all games aside, you ought to pack at least one in your everyday carry bag.

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How can chopsticks be weapons?

Chopsticks as weapons

*Note* – I write this as an Australian, meaning I need to consider chopsticks as weapons. We are legally denied any right to bear arms and are barely allowed to defend ourselves against an attack. If you’re an American, wave your guns and laugh at us. You’re lucky to have the right to bear arms and defend yourselves. Here in Australia anything that would give us a chance of winning a fight is illegal.

Now of course, standard restaurant plastic chopsticks aren’t going to get you too far. The same goes for bamboo disposable ones. If you’re backed into a corner and well practiced, you could break them in half and hail Mary for some soft points to hit. Ears, nose, eyes, or throat would all stop an attacker if hit hard repeatedly with sharp chopsticks.

Chopsticks as weapons
You can consider using stainless steel chopsticks as weapons.

However, just yesterday as I was browsing the internet I came across solid titanium chopsticks. There are lots of good reasons for carrying a set of solid titanium chopsticks as weapons. They –

  • fit unobtrusively into any bag.
  • weigh next to nothing.
  • are extremely durable.
  • are very handy for eating.
  • are very hard to break.
  • are extremely deniable as weapons.

 

It is sad to live in a society in which one has to consider the utility of everyday objects like chopsticks as weapons, but with things as they are it’s better to do as the boyscouts do and “be prepared”. Because chopsticks can fit into any bag, I would make sure they’re always in the same spot every time. Make it an easy to reach spot so you can quickly have them in your hand. Practice getting them out so you won’t be caught by surprise or have them catch in the bag at an inopportune moment.

Above is a video of some simple striking defenses that you can use with a chopstick. The difficulty is that they are extremely close range weapons. You will be completely exposed to any weapons your attacker has themselves. Also, your attacker will not wait around kindly holding your shoulder while you prepare your defense. It will be a street fight, not the court of law. Because of this you must have a well practiced movement that “unholsters” your chopsticks and brings them to bear smoothly and quickly. If they have a knife and you can run, that’s always the best option. If they just want your stuff, consider what you’re willing to risk to keep your stuff. Is it replaceable? But if you have no choice and your attacker wants to harm you either way, be ready to defend yourself and make sure you’re the one who gets home this time.

Chopsticks as weapons
This chopstick would give someone a chance of defending themselves against an attacker, and is illegal therefore in Australia.

Steel chopsticks will not splinter no matter which way you grasp them for striking. With practice, you can increase your grip to deliver even harder stabs with your chopsticks. Stabs are the only strike possible with a chopstick; it has few other utilities as a weapon. The areas of your attacker’s body that you can reach with your chopstick would be reachable with your hand anyway, so it doesn’t meaningfully increase your attack range. What it does meaningfully though, is concentrate force. Think of how hard you can punch. Now get that energy focused into a 6mm² area – suddenly your puny punch is pretty damn hard. An example of this is women’s stiletto heels – the contact point of those heels exerts more pressure than an elephant’s foot. Do not use this example in front of an actual woman.

My point is that if you decide that chopsticks are an option for you as an everyday weapon, don’t just leave them in your bag. They’re as much good there as any other weapon you have no training with. Practice using them, “drawing” them, and striking with them. If your life depends on it you’ll only have one shot.

Check out the rest of the Everyday Weapons Series

How to use chopsticks as weapons

How to use drumsticks as weapons

How to use keys as weapons

How to use a pen as a weapon

How to use an umbrella as a weapon

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How much land do you need to be self sufficient?

Have you ever wondered how much land you’d need to be self sufficient? Here’s a neat infographic from IBOG.org who seem to have done some math for you, you math-hater. The conclusion they reach is that you need roughly 8000 m² or two acres. Where I live, that’s equivalent to four large suburban residential blocks. Owning that much land here in Australia, in a city, would make anyone’s wallet take a shovel and begin to dig itself a grave. To be self sufficient, one would need to go outside the cities to afford the small parcel of land necessary for crops and animals.

Given the cost:benefit ratio of living in a major city (that’d be high cost:low benefits), I have often considered going outside and buying some land to grow things. Clean air, better health, lower cost of living, no traffic, smaller debts (or even no debts at all). Yeah, it sure doesn’t sound bad.

Self sufficient
Infographic courtesy of IBOG.org

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8 ways to use your survival knife

Everyone from the Cookie Monster to the Pope, if asked which three items they would take to a desert island, would list a survival knife at some point. The survival knife is fundamental and essential to many tasks. It can do so much stuff that it’s close to being an all-in-one package. Now granted, most of what the survival knife does involves cutting. But without that, you’ll probably find yourself up a creek. You know which one.

In honour of the grand patriarch of all tools, the survival knife, I thought I’d list some of the many ways that a survival knife can help you on your next adventure.

  • Emergency First Aid: First things first – always use the actual correct tools if you have them. Don’t extract a splinter with your 8″ knife if you have tweezers. There’s nothing manly about an infection. But a knife can help you in a pinch. Turn clothing into bandage strips to manage bleeding and keep dirt out of open wounds. Cut sticks to length for spints to keep a broken bone steady. A sharp tip can lance a boil or dig splinters out. But like I said – emergencies only.

survival knife

  • Batoning through wood: If your knife has a full tang and is soundly made it will put up with batoning through wood. Simply stand the piece of wood up on its end and put your knife across the top surface. Take another sturdy piece of wood and hit it on the back of the blade, driving the knife through the wood and splitting it in two pieces. The longer the blade, the thicker pieces of wood you’ll be able to manage with this technique.

survival knife

  • Making other tools: Your knife can make sturdy branches of 4-5cm diameter into spears. Just clean the twigs off and get to work making a nice sharp point on one end. Then hold it high above your head screaming “Come at me bears!!” I’d put money on every bear nearby wussing out. But in all seriousness – you’re far better off with a nice spear between you and an attacker, be they human, animal, or both. You don’t want to let something dangerous close enough that you can strike it with a knife.

survival knife

  • Gutting and cleaning kill: A big survival knife will make you wish for a more elegant and maneuverable knife when skinning, gutting, or cleaning. It will do a far better job than you could with your bare hands though, and you will be grateful for that. The best knife is the one you’ve got with you. There is no one-size-fits-all knife. The bigger ones are going to be no fun when you have to work with them in tight spaces. The smaller ones will frustrate you with their limited cutting edge.  The ability to do the job at all is much more important than being fussy about how it turns out. Especially when every kilo counts.

survival knife

  • Hammer: Remember what I said about using the correct tool for the job? If you’ve got a hammer just use the hammer. But if you don’t… you’ve chosen a solid knife with a full tang, right? You’re nodding. That’s good. And it has a nice pommel on it doesn’t it? More nods, great. Well, given that you’ve made a fine choice of a sound knife with a full tang and a pommel, the option of using your knife’s butt as a hammer may present itself. You will have nowhere near the power that a hammer can dish out, but you will also not have to carry a hammer. As someone who has carried hammers for days and days, I can tell you that this should come as a relief to be told you will not have to carry one.

survival knife

  • Makeshift spear: Do you have overwhelming and misplaced confidence in a skill you’ve never trained in? If so, go ahead and make a spear out of your knife. Zip ties or any sort of rope can secure the knife to the end of a stick, taking your knife from dachshund to greyhound in a matter of moments. The reason you might not want to do this is because zip ties can break and knots can come undone, and if they do at a critical moment, your knife will be gone. You won’t even be able to sharpen any new branches into wooden spears after that.

survival knife

  • Whittling and making feather sticks: To feather a stick, take your stick and begin to peel it with your knife like you would a carrot. Now instead of pulling your peelings off, leave them connected to the stick. Increasing the surface area of the stick like this makes it ideal fire kindling, as it can burn faster and hotter, and get your fire started on heavier wood sooner.

If arts and crafts appeal to you, you can also use your knife for carving. Whittling has been a hobby for outdoorsmen, hunters, and hobos for millennia. Find yourself a little branch and start your project whenever you get bored. For the total look, if helps if you whistle a tune while you’re carving.

survival knifesurvival knife

  • Making Shelter: While not strictly an all-knife job, if a knife is all you got then it’s all you got. If your blade is long enough, you will be able to use it to baton through saplings and branches. Select an area protected from wind but also unlikely to flood (don’t pick a dry creek bed). Use a long branch and lean it against a tree or a large boulder. If you don’t have one of them near you’ll have to set vertical poles to support the main horizontal beam / branch. When you have these two, you can begin to lean branches against the framework to create a rough angled roof which will reduce the wind and catch most of the rain. Hoorah!

survival knife

So there, I’ve listed a few ideas of how a survival knife can serve you out there. Are there any good functions I’ve missed? No doubt you’ll let me know in the comments.

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