Ka-Bar Tanto Review

The Ka-Bar Tanto. It’s like two legendary fighters decided to have a baby. The lore surrounding the tanto blade design, its roots in the mystical oriental warrior life of old, combined with the industrial know-how of an American centurion. I have my hands on one, so let’s do a review!

Continue reading “Ka-Bar Tanto Review”

Cold Steel Brooklyn Smasher Review

Before I got a Cold Steel Brooklyn Smasher, I don’t know how many bats I’ve broken on the worthless faces of invaders in my home. I’ve lost count. Just when you’re really starting to feel the moment, right when your home invader realises they’ve broken into the wrong place and they’ve tried to rob the wrong guy. Right at the moment when the bat breaks across his face, that’s when the disappointment is most palpable. Continue reading “Cold Steel Brooklyn Smasher Review”

Hella Flash 300 Review

Hella Flash 300 Review

Hella Flash 300 Design & Construction

 Hella Flash 300 Review

The Hella Flash 300’s body is all aluminium, with a rubberised handle grip. The end of the torch screws off to open the body for inserting or removing batteries. This same end section is also made of aluminium, and I’m really beginning to resent the Americans for trying to remove the final “I” in aluminium by stealth in autocorrect. The end section has a hanger for an included wrist strap. The on/off switch is a button on the pommel (if indeed a torch can have a pommel).
The front section of the torch is extendable, the result of which is a beam that can be focused down to a pin-point. Sliding the front section all the way up narrows the beam, and sliding it back down widens the beam.

 

Included in the Hella Flash 300 box

  • Flash 300 torch
  • 3x C batteries
  • Wrist strap that is a nightmare to attach. A nightmare.
  • Nylon pouch with belt loop
 Hella Flash 300 Review

Look of the Hella Flash 300 

 

Hella Flash 300 Review

It doesn’t look like a tactical weapon, which is great. The Flash 300 looks more industrial. It is unlikely to draw much attention at all. One probably still couldn’t pack it in carry-on luggage though, because anyone could be a murderous Al-Qaeda these days.

Its aluminum body has a brushed matte black painted finish. This paint does wear off and chip, if that matters to you. It’s not anodised on or anything.

The little Hella brand stamp on the sliding front section of the torch is some of the worst printing I’ve ever seen on a finished product. It’s like the manufacturer asked for a 20 x 20 pixel logo specifically to be stuck on there. Don’t hold it too close to your eye, the pixels are huge. Think I’m too fussy? I guess I just like a bit more effort to go into the presentation of relatively expensive flashlights.

 

Hella Flash 300 Review Using the Hella Flash 300 is like

 

Hella Flash 300 Review

The Flash 300 feels well-made. The aluminium body, when loaded with batteries, has a certain heft to it that gives the feel of a solid tool. There is nothing cheap or weak in the build of this flashlight. The body is wrapped with a textured rubber grip, which feels easier to hold onto than smooth metal. The grip is wrapped tight onto the body and has no play. All up, this flashlight feels great in the hand.
The light that comes out of this flashlight is, to me, insane. It is huge, a real pocket floodlight. As you can see in my comparison picture below, where my camera can barely get murky detail from my phone light at ISO 800, the Hella Flash 300 makes my hallway look like daytime. Such is the light output from this torch. Hella are a well-known manufacturer for lights, so it makes sense that this is a good one.
Hella Flash 300 Review
The butt of the Flash 300 is where the on/off button is located. The button itself functions nicely. It does its job and doesn’t feel like it’s going to crap out in a few months. Like the rest of the flashlight, it feels well made. I would have liked it to be in a different location though; maybe up towards the front of the torch. The reason for this is so that I could use the torch as a self-defensive weapon. If I were to stab with this torch, I wouldn’t know which part to use. The front is delicate, housing a glass lens, LED, and then mounted on that extendable section. It might break after a few goes (not how we want things to end with a $75 flashlight). The butt has that on/off button. That means either smashing the function out of the flashlight, as after a few shots this button would certainly die, or repeatedly blinding yourself as you defend yourself with your makeshift weapon. Imagine striking to an attacker’s head with the button of the torch and having it blast 300 lux right back at you. That could be in a Jackie Chan fight scene! As it is, there’s no part of this torch I could really strike with, which unfortunately precludes the Flash 300 from all but the most last-resort kinds of self defense.
The business end of the flashlight can slide out or in, to focus the beam narrow or wide. This is one niggle I have with the Flash 300 – the beam isn’t as wide as I’d like it to be, even at full width. Being able to focus the beam down to a laser point is of pretty limited utility to me. The only way I could think to use that function is for self defense. Maybe someone is in your house and like me, you’re an Australian who is legally denied self-defensive weapons. So maybe you sneak through the darkness to where that scummer is, then you hit him right in the eyes with the most focused beam of the Flash 300 to create a nice opening and break some ribs. Maybe that. But besides really blinding scum, I can’t think of a reason to narrow and already-narrow beam. I’d just prefer that it could open up a bit wider, even though that means diluting the light output a little.
Hella Flash 300 Review
Both images are f2.8, 1/80 sec, ISO 800. LEFT is my mobile phone light, RIGHT is the Hella Flash 300.

Good For

  • Being a flashlight
  • Build quality
  • High light output to body size
  • Blinding attackers
Hella Flash 300 Review

Bad For

  • Being a weapon

Price

I got mine from my workplace, so the price I bought for is a little better than ebay. That said, you can find this flashlight for around USD$50 if you have a good look around. It might be becoming a bit of a legacy item at this point, but the Hella Flash 300 is still sold on eBay.
Hella Flash 300 Review

Hella Flash 300 Review Conclusion

Having owned and used the Hella Flash 300 for a while now, I might have bought something different if I was shopping again. It’s a very solid flashlight and it performs well with huge light output for its body size. Unfortunately it has not been built with the secondary function of makeshift weapon in mind, which is something I’d look for in a flashlight. Also, its widest beam focus setting is still more narrow than I like. Shining a torch at my feet in the dark and having it illuminate a crisp 1m² pool limits this light’s utility. In summary I would say it’s a good build, but not a great one.

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Leatherman Wave Review

Leatherman Wave Review

For my Leatherman Wave Review the first question I need to answer is – how did the Leatherman Wave come about? I suppose that early one Tuesday afternoon, Baron von Leatherman awoke from his nap with a quandary. Why, he mused, can I not fit seventeen different tools into the breast pocket of my smoking jacket? He pondered the usefulness of a pocket big enough to host all seventeen tools, or some sort of new fandangled contraption that combines all of them into the one. He imagined a world in which anything was possible, as he sank into his deepest recliner for another sumptuous afternoon nap. That was the year 1412. Today Baron von Leatherman’s multitool designs have paved the way for something much better than enormous smoking jackets.

Leatherman Wave Review

 

Price

Like always, you’re gonna get a better deal just for being in the US. Make the mistake of being born somewhere else and naturally, you’re gonna pay for it. I got my Leatherman Wave from eBay because when shipping was factored in, it was still the best price and it was only being shipped within Australia (where I live). There are fewer chances for the shipping company to screw it up if they’re domestic.

If you live in the US you’re going to find Amazon hard to beat unless you find an excellent discount price or you’ve got an insider.

Leatherman Wave Review

Design & Construction

The Leatherman Wave is / has

  • All stainless steel contruction
  • Needlenose pliers
  • Regular pliers
  • Wire cutters
  • Hard-wire cutters
  • 420HC knife
  • 420HC serrated knife
  • Saw
  • Scissors
  • Wood/metal file
  • Diamond-coated file
  • Large bit driver
  • Small bit driver
  • Medium screwdriver
  • 8-inch (19-cm) ruler
  • Bottle opener
  • Can opener
  • Wire stripper
  • Excluding the pliers, all tools lock open
  • One hand accessible knifeblades

Leatherman Wave Review

Included in the box

  • Seventeen tools
  • Nylon pouch
  • Instruction sheet
  • Sense of invincibility

Leatherman Wave Review

Look

The Leatherman Wave is an attractively packaged piece of gear. Its body is all brushed stainless steel with ‘Leatherman’ branding visible from basically any angle. This is probably so that you remember why you paid ten times more than you would for a generic hardware store multitool. Folded up, everything goes away neatly leaving you to look at the little rulers they’ve embossed on the handles for you.

Leatherman Wave Review

I couldn’t think of a way around wearing it on my belt in its little nylon pouch. It falls to hand easiest from there but man, it gives off the strongest ’90s dad’s mobile phone vibe there on my belt. Wearing the Leatherman Wave nearly made me start yelling at kids I don’t have to pick up around the house. Wearing a Leatherman Wave on your belt makes other choices seem rational, like high socks with your flip-flops. You have to be okay with that.

Leatherman Wave Review

Feel

Being made from all stainless steel, the Leatherman Wave is a dense item. Maybe even heavy, if you can put up with people sneering at you for calling a 300 gram tool “heavy”.

“Oh is it heavy is it Princess? Maybe you need me to carry your lunch for you too. Oh, be careful not to touch the ground. It’s made of dirt.

Leatherman Wave Review

It feels useful, and by extension makes its user feel useful. Carry the Wave and automatically you just feel handy. As if you know that you can handle anything that pops up. Some part of the end of the world requires pliers, a set of 6cm long knives, and a pop-out mini screwdriver? You know you’re on top from the start.

Leatherman Wave Review

Using it is like

The four outside-accessible tools operate smoothly. Having the little gap on top of the knife blades to just pop them out with my thumb is incredible. I can just grab a knife out of the Leatherman Wave body even if I’m doing something else with my other hand. The pliers’ transformation is also smooth, with a satisfying clunk at the end. The internal tools however are pain, misery, and frustration to open up. They actually require keys to get out cause I’m just not that into tearing a fingernail off every time I need the screwdriver. To make the difficulty of opening the internal tools even more insulting, the Leatherman site lists all tools as being operable with just one hand. Well I don’t even know how to take that.

Leatherman Wave Review

The knife blades are 420HC stainless steel. The HC stands for ‘High Carbon’. High carbon steels are less rust resistant than higher chromium stainless steels, with the trade off being hardness (carbon) for rust resistance (chromium). I was a bit surprised then, when I went to give my blunt knife blade a sharpen. The steel is not really hard. In fact, in giving the knife a good sharpening I lost more steel on the blade than I have on an extremely cheap kitchen knife that I have. That was disappointing. It means that I have to make a hard choice about keeping a keen edge on the Leatherman Wave’s knife, or losing the whole thing in another ten sharpens or so. The steel should be much harder than that.

Leatherman Wave Review

The serrated edge knife is excellent and very sharp straight from the box. I don’t use it at all, except for cutting cloth or rope. Initially I was so impressed by how nicely the serrated blade cuts that I really got into using it. Then I realised that I’d have to figure out how to sharpen it, and serrated edges are the worst thing in the world to sharpen. So yeah, cloth and rope only.

The nylon carry pouch does the job, but the velcro on the flap that is supposed to hold it shut gives up after a few months of use. How does velcro just give up? I can’t figure it out either, but it just won’t stick shut anymore. Not good.

Leatherman Wave Review

The pliers are excellent, allowing me to clamp on with all the grip that I can muster in both hands. Using the pliers with all my strength does no damage at all to them, which is testament to the great build quality of the Wave. The scissors are large enough to be useful in a pinch, but for anything more than emergency paper-cutting they’re a pain. The same goes for the screwdriver. I would almost prefer to climb down the ladder to fetch an actual screwdriver. Almost. But I wouldn’t really, because the Wave’s screwdriver will do the trick after I’ve levered it out. And I’m lazy enough to lever it out, every single time.

Leatherman Wave Review

Good For

  • When you need pliers that can just pop out of nowhere.
  • When you need a knife to just pop out of nowhere.
  • Quick jobs.
  • When you have no other choice but to use a multitool instead of the actual version of the tool.
  • Carrying a toolbox in a package smaller than your fancy iPhone.
  • Feeling useful and handy everywhere you go.

Leatherman Wave Review

Bad For

  • 420HC blade steel is soft. Not soft enough to sleep on, but it dulls too quickly.
  • Internal tools (screwdriver, scissors, bottle opener) are a nightmare to get out without using your keys.
  • Poor quality velcro on nylon carry pouch stops sticking shut after a few months.

Leatherman Wave Review

Leatherman Wave Review Conclusion

You probably need a Leatherman Wave. It might not be perfect, but when you’re popping screwdrivers out of the handles of a pair of pliers what do you expect? None of the tools except the knives and the pliers work as well as their full-size equivalents. On the other hand, they all fit into a package weighing less than 300 grams. What do you want? Life is a series of compromises. Are you just gonna sit there looking goofy and wondering how to cram seventeen tools into the breast pocket of your smoking jacket? Or are you gonna take a solid compromise that does pretty good at most things. Cause that’s how to sum the Leatherman Wave up. For the functions it’s supposed to perform, it’s pretty good at most of them.

Leatherman Wave Review

**Disclosure** This site is supported by its readers. I may receive commission from the links you click on. This in no way influences my judgments in reviews. All products reviewed were paid for, NOT supplied by manufacturers.

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Victorinox INOX Review

The Victorinox INOX Review

Before our Victorinox INOX review, it seemed that if you wanted a tough watch your list of options had only one entry; starting with ‘G’ and ending with ‘Shock’. Casio’s resin rhinoceros is cheap, indestructible, and reliable. But above all, it’s cheap. What’s a lover of tough watches supposed to do, then, when it comes time to grow up and dress like a gentleman? The g-shock that was so cool in high school is suddenly concentrated lady repellent. One might consider looking to other manufacturers. Namely Victorinox, maker of the world famous Swiss Army Knife. They also make a rather fetching Swiss Army Watch, named the INOX which we’ll be taking a look at today.

Victorinox INOX

Price

$500 – $1500 seems to be the ballpark. That’s a range of a full thousand dollars, and I don’t know about you but to me, a thousand big ones makes a difference. Especially when the $1500 one is the exact same thing as the $500 one. Buy it carefully then, and enjoy a lower price rather than a pampering retail experience.

Compromising on the material of the band can also net savings of around $100. Maybe that’s important to you, and maybe it’s not. Personally I think a stainless steel band is entire ladders above a rubber band in every measurable metric. Remember you’re looking for a tough watch that doesn’t look like a g-shock.

Victorinox INOX review

As we can see in the above price action, the metal banded version of the Victorinox INOX generally trades in the high US$300 to low US$600 range. Based on past performance, it seems reasonable to expect that if you can hold off buying until Christmas time, you should be able to grab one for under US$400.

Victorinox INOX review

Design & Construction

Each Victorinox INOX is cut in one piece from the hull of a Russian military surplus tank. The steel is then reforged in the core of the Earth to create steel that will nearly kill you if you look at it wrong. So I’m exaggerating a little. The INOX is

Victorinox INOX review

  • All stainless steel construction.
  • Quartz movement
  • Sapphire crystal glass face
  • Screw-down crown
  • Hours / Minutes / Seconds / Date displayed on the face
  • Water resistant to 200m / 20 bar of pressure
  • Resistant to 8 tons of pressure in a crush test
  • Withstands sand and dust storm
  • Resists corrosive salty fog
  • Resists nitric and sulphuric acid
  • Still runs after being in a washing machine (2 hours // 90°C)
  • Resistant to temperatures -58°C to +71°C
  • Resistant to vibration
  • Withstands 10 meters drop test onto concrete

The Victorinox INOX design reads like someone just began to list things that would kill people, and then built a watch that could survive it all. 10 meter drops onto concrete. Being nearly boiled in a washing machine for two hours. This isn’t fooling around.

Victorinox INOX review

Included

  • Watch
  • Instruction manual
  • Totally neat box

Victorinox INOX review

Look

It would be unkind to describe the INOX as plain. Unkind and untrue. A fairer assessment is that while its design is stark and utilitarian, the INOX radiates handsome simplicity. No clutter on its face, no garish dials that would make a wearer feel like Action Man. Just the time, steadily being drummed out by a reliable quartz movement, with nothing else to distract from it. My INOX is the black faced version with the stainless steel band. I am very partial to the lack of complications on its dial. It can just as easily go out with me when I’m in shorts and a T-shirt, as it can when I’m looking as sharp as I can for business. It looks great peeking out from under a shirt cuff. The watch is neither advertising itself as “XTREME“, nor you as a grizzled macho-man (as much as you might be one deep inside).

Victorinox INOX review

Feel

The Victorinox INOX is a substantial watch. Its body is thick, and dense. The weight is reassuring. The watch somehow feels reliable. There’s no play anywhere in the case. I can tell it’s been built to a very high standard. The screw down crown has a sort of steel collar enveloping its sides to ensure that it won’t be subject to any unwanted adjustments throughout the day. It’s a real solid feeling part of the watch too.

Victorinox INOX review

Feeling it on my wrist, I hear the INOX telling me “Mikey…don’t worry about anything. All the things that could kill you today will be barely noticeable to me.” Its indifference to my mortality makes me feel safer for some reason. I do tend to ignore its relative invincibility though, rather choosing to baby it and keep it far from harm. I know the INOX won’t flinch at a days’ work, but I still won’t take it along for one. The sturdiness of the watch is offset by its handsome looks which sadly, I am quite unwilling to risk.

Victorinox INOX review

Using it is like

The watch’s uncluttered dial makes for a nice simple experience when wearing the watch. I know that in the watch world the $500 – $1000 bracket is flooded and makes any sort of connoisseur turn their nose up. I guess at $10000 they start to become willing to make begrudging eye contact. I don’t know cause I’m not one, nor do I aspire to be one. I like the way the Victorinox INOX is unobtrusive and conservative. It doesn’t draw undue attention out there. Maybe you want a watch that doesn’t big-note you and just gets on with it while looking handsome. This is that watch.

Victorinox INOX review

The band is very solid and has also been designed with punishing XTREME lifestyles in mind. The clasp is a nice piece of engineering but can be fiddly in real world use. Especially if you want to put the watch on in the dark but your wife is still asleep next to you. Cue the crashing and bumping that makes a grumpy wife.

The first drawback I will note is that for the price, the INOX is still battery powered. Now I wouldn’t expect a fancy self-winding mechanical movement to put up with serious abuse, and I certainly wouldn’t expect it for $500. But surely they could have licenced some ‘Tough Solar’ or something. This watch is a bit expensive to still be battery powered, regardless of the fact that batteries are very reliable. At some point that battery is going to go out and I’m either going to need that obscure tool that undoes the back of a watch, or I’m going to need some good old fashioned jewelry shop extortion.

The second flaw is something badly overlooked. The hour markers and hands are coated with some glow in the dark paint that, even when the lights first go out, is extremely dim. This is compared to a Citizen Nighthawk that shares the nightstand with this INOX. At 4am I can still check the time on my Nighthawk, but I won’t even be able to find my INOX right next to me. This is a big disappointment, as a watch ought to be readable in the dark.

Victorinox INOX review

++Pros++

  • Good for people who are regularly run over by tanks and bulldozers, get stuck inside operating combination washing machine / boilers, fall from 10m high into concrete, get splashed with sulphuric acid, or are shaken vigorously for extended periods.
  • Even if none of these things happen to you, it’s still an unobtrusively handsome tough watch.
  • Excellent materials and build quality.
  • Uncomplicated style.
  • Can be had for a reasonable price if you shop around.

–Cons–

  • All it does is tell the time.
  • Battery powered instead of solar or some sort of magical toughened self-winding system
  • Clasp can be fiddly in the dark.
  • Glowing markers for hours and hands are very dim in the dark.

Victorinox INOX review

Victorinox INOX Review Conclusion

The ‘Tough Watch’ segment is growing up with its market. That’s a good thing. Even though there are lovely $5000+ military watches from manufacturers like Panerai, it’s hard to resolve the idea of getting out there and working hard in a watch that cost two months’ wages. Heck, for me I wouldn’t even take something that expensive out of the box. The Victorinox INOX then, is a solid compromise. Swiss built, hard enough to use as a weapon, good-enough looking, and reasonably priced. There’s no need to default to the colourful rubbery world of g-shocks anymore. You can have something just as tough that doesn’t need to scream about how tough it is. You can have a grown-up’s tough watch.

Victorinox INOX review

Disclosure

This site is supported by its readers. I may receive commission from the links you click on. This in no way influences my judgments in reviews. All products reviewed were paid for, NOT supplied by manufacturers.

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Cold Steel SRK San Mai III Review

Cold Steel SRK San Mai III Review

The Cold Steel SRK San Mai III (Survival Recon Knife) was first survival knife I ever bought. It’s a hell of a name, and on paper it seems like a hell of a knife. I read countless reviews and forum posts before deciding on it. I even nearly decided against it, having come across some forums that were highly critical of Cold Steel as a company. I read that their quality had disappeared after they became popular. I read that they were better at marketing than they were at making knives. All of this made me a little dubious of Cold Steel. In the end I reasoned that the only way to find out was to get one for myself.

Cold Steel SRK San Mai III Review

Price

The best delivered prices for the Cold Steel SRK San Mai III are usually from Amazon, but delivery can be tricky if you’re outside of the US. At the time of writing, Amazon is selling the Cold Steel SRK San Mai III for a fair price, but I’m in Australia where customs don’t need to give any reason for seizing your imported goods. Even a vegetable peeler can get you on a terrorism watch list over here. In fact, writing the words “terrorism watch list” on the internet could probably get you on a terrorism watch list. So yeah…there’s that.

Cold Steel SRK San Mai 3

I digress. I got lucky and picked up my Cold Steel SRK San Mai III on eBay for AU$132 shipped. A fine price indeed, given that shipping prices sometimes get out of hand on eBay.

Update 7 July 2017 – I can no longer find the Cold Steel SRK San Mai III on Amazon, which is a shame because it’s a fine knife. Only one eBay seller has one, at this link. Besides this, you’re probably down to local stocks in individual local stores, which makes buying recommendations difficult.

Included in the box

  • Knife
  • Sheath

Design & Construction

The Cold Steel SRK San Mai III is

Cold Steel SRK San Mai III Review

  • Fixed blade – no moving parts or articulation
  • Full tang – One piece construction. The handle and the blade are the same piece of metal. No seams or joins.
  • Hunting type blade – The belly of the blade curves, making it better for work like skinning, cutting, or slashing. A curved blade makes the cutting edge longer because mathematics. The point of the blade is a clipped point with a swage. The swage refers to the upper edge of the point, which has been ground to two angled edges. This brings the point of the blade lower, making for a more acute point on the tip. A more acute tip penetrates more easily in a stab (please don’t stab anything with your lovely SRK SM3).
  • San Mai 3″ steel – which is a marketing name for the three layered laminate steel used for the SRK SM3’s blade. The core layer is a harder steel, which on its own would wear poorly or maybe even crack due to being too brittle. The outer layers are softer steel, giving flexible support to the core layer.
  • Kraton handle – This is a nice firm type of rubber with a grippy pattern all over it.
  • Kydex sheath – More marketing names, this time for the plastic the sheath is made from.

For more information on blade steel and design, click through to The Ultra Survivalist’s Guide To Survival Knives.

Cold Steel SRK San Mai III Review

Look

The Cold Steel SRK San Mai 3 definitely looks the business. Besides the marketing names for the materials used in construction, it is a very no nonsense knife. No tacticool, no bling, just a tool made of the bare essentials for doing what it does.

Feel

In a word, solid. The Cold Steel SRK San Mai 3 is very well made and its price is justified in the build quality. It’s a very tight package.

Cold Steel SRK San Mai III Review

In the hand, the knife has a reassuring weight. It’s not as heavy as a Becker Bk2, and you’ll probably feel grateful for that.  I wouldn’t mind a more substantial finger guard before the blade. That would inspire a little more confidence with stabs and whatnot. The handle is a rounded-off square shape which could have had some more substance. I mean, a hundred something dollar knife deserves to feel a bit nicer. In truth, I have a $5 knock-off Global santoku that feels much better in hand than the Cold Steel SRK San Mai 3. The kraton grip is very good though, and even cuts down slipperiness in the wet.

Cold Steel SRK San Mai III Review

Using It

I have to admit that I was taken by the (admittedly compelling) marketing of Cold Steel. Their flashy videos made it seem like I was buying an atom bomb in the shape of a knife. I was a little taken aback then, when I unboxed it and used it for the first time. It cut the paper I held, sure. And true, it went through the cardboard too. But it wasn’t smooth, perfect, falling through matter as if it parted it on a molecular level. To be honest, the factory didn’t send it out with arm-shaving sharpness. Don’t get me wrong – I wouldn’t try to catch the SRK SM3 as it falls. It would still teach me a good lesson if I tried, as it is most certainly cutting-sharp out of the box. But I will have to spend some quality time with this knife and my sharpener before its cutting abilities can really wow anyone.

Edge retention is good – after doing some batoning I still could cut paper as my video shows. That’s a strong plus.

Cold Steel SRK San Mai III Review

Good For

  • A feeling of security that comes from having a solid knife with one’s self
  • Reasonable price
  • Standing up to punishment
  • Batoning
  • General cutting (duh)

Bad For

  • Fine work
  • Coming out of the box with a hair popping razor edge (as advertised)
  • Using as a shovel (digging will dull any edge, fast)
  • Using as a pry bar
  • Carry on luggage
  • Wearing in shopping centres
  • Baby’s first knife fight
  • Anything else that knives are bad for.

Cold Steel SRK San Mai III Review

Cold Steel SRK San Mai III Review Conclusion

Ultimately I think that as long as you’re not going too far above the $100 mark, the Cold Steel SRK San Mai 3 a great knife. Good enough to be the only one you take out. It has the reassuring build quality, the edge retention, and the no nonsense design that most are going to need in their adventures. Expect it to lose a lot of razor sharpness if you use it for jobs that knives are generally not meant for. On the other hand, it will really stand up to anything you do to it without complaining.  Given its best competitor (the Fallkniven A1) starts at more than twice the price of a Cold Steel SRK San Mai 3, I’m betting on this knife being all the knife you need. Just remember to give it a sharpen before you head out 😉

Cold Steel SRK San Mai III Review

**Disclosure** This site is supported by its readers. I may receive commission from the links you click on. This in no way influences my judgments in reviews. All products reviewed were paid for, NOT supplied by manufacturers.

Is there something you want to buy? Let the world know at www.wants2buy.com – the world’s premier wanted classifieds. Free to register, advertise, and communicate.